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“1000th Cornish language street sign unveiled

The gradual translation of street names into the Cornish language has reached a significant milestone with the one-thousandth sign being put up in Looe.

The bilingual naming of Marina Drive/Rosva Vorek was part of a rolling policy brought in by Cornwall Council to replace damaged or missing signs with both languages.

Julian German, CC’s portfolio holder for economy and culture, said: “Using the Cornish language is really important for many reasons and I would like to thank all of those involved in reaching this milestone.

“It’s great to see we now have one thousand bilingual signs across Cornwall. The Cornish language is an important part of Cornwall’s heritage. The use of Cornish is growing in all walks of life and the opportunities to learn and use it are increasing all the time.”

Since its inception in 2010, the place-name and street signage panel of the Cornish Language Partnership has provided all the translations.

The Marina Drive/Rosva Vorek sign is the latest stage in a long-term policy. Rosva is the Cornish for a drive, being made up of ros (wheel) and va (a suffix meaning place), while mor is the word for sea and ek is an adjectival suffix.

A spokesman for the Cornish Language Partnership said: “Like most languages, nouns in Cornish have a gender and are either masculine or feminine. In this case the word rosva is feminine. In common with the other Celtic languages, in certain cases the first letter of an adjective is changed, or mutated, after a feminine noun. So in this case Rosva Morek becomes Rosva Vorek.”

The translation of street signs are undertaken for Cornwall Council by a panel of volunteers, supported by MAGA, the Cornish Language Partnership. The panel also works with developers and others on the naming of new sites.”

By AnBalores Posted: February 18, 2014

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  • AnBalores  |  February 18 2014, 12:05PM

    Panel chairman Nev Meek said, "Working with developers is really rewarding since we can ensure the names for developments and streets preserve something of their history and can be in keeping with their surroundings." Mr Meek explained that Cornish language and bilingual signage in Cornwall is nothing new. Streets in Cornwall were historically named in Cornish when it was the language, others were named in Cornish in the 1930s and more still during the later part of the 20th century. The former Kerrier and Carrick district councils also erected more than 600 signs between the 1970s and 1990s and it is now estimated that some 17% of all signs across Cornwall are either in Cornish or are bilingual. Cornwall Council encourages developers to name new streets in Cornish and in other cases ensure that our streets are named bilingually. In a recent survey in Cornwall 88% of those questioned said they were aware of the Cornish language street names and almost the same number agreed that the language helps to promote Cornwall's distinctiveness.

  • Big_Ger  |  February 18 2014, 8:28PM

    Wheel place sea "ek" Street?

  • AnBalores  |  February 18 2014, 9:43PM

    Ek is an adjectival suffix Bigger.

  • cweatherhill  |  February 19 2014, 9:57PM

    Just so that people know - these signs don't cost you a penny extra. Street signs have a limited life, and are replaced as a matter of course. When one requires replacement, the new sign is bilingual. The laser process of lettering costs no more to print six words than it does to produce one. The Signage Panel and its advisors (of whom I'm one where historic names are involved) put in a lot of work, but all are unpaid.

  • Big_Ger  |  February 20 2014, 8:24AM

    Ok, so adding the "ek" adjectival suffix which gives; 'likeness to', 'being of the kind of', 'association with' leaves us with; "Wheel place sea-like Street" "Wheel place of the kind of sea Street" "Wheel place (in) association with the sea Street" How poetic.

  • PaddyTrembath  |  February 20 2014, 10:12AM

    Yes Big_Ger, English is such an ugly language, ism/t it.

  • Big_Ger  |  February 20 2014, 8:05PM

    The multiple ironies contained in Paddy's last message would be obvious to anyone, anyone apart from a Cornish nationalist that is.

  • T_Flamank  |  February 20 2014, 8:40PM

    Magnificent achievement and celebration of our Celtic language. The actual figure has now exceeded 1,000! More developments coming soon!

  • rickoon  |  February 20 2014, 8:54PM

    Paddy loves you really B_G. He just can't humble himself enough to admit it lol. Where else would they get a nat repellent like you B_G? It keeps them on their toes lol.

  • Big_Ger  |  February 21 2014, 11:03PM

    Please "Rickoon", I can do without Paddy"s adoration.

 
 

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