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Women felt 'totally violated' by voyeur with spy camera at RNAS Culdrose

By West Briton  |  Posted: October 13, 2012

TruroCourtsofJustice

A "DIRTY and disgusting" Navy engineer's secret photographing of women in changing rooms at RNAS Culdrose left them feeling "totally violated and betrayed".

They were targeted with a "spy camera" installed in the accommodation by aircraft technician David Esam, 28.

He pleaded guilty at Truro Crown Court to six charges of voyeurism, having first started spying on his wife when he suspected she was having an affair.

He was spared jail by Recorder Nigel Pascoe, QC, who made a three-year community order involving supervision and participation in a sex offenders' programme.

Esam, a married man who now lives in Hull, was also placed on the sex offenders register for five years.

The Recorder told him he had caused distress, anger and potential damage to six women whose privacy had been grossly violated.

"Your conduct was dirty and disgusting," he declared.

Esam was also ordered to pay each of his victims £500 in compensation.

Iain White, for the CPS, said the offences came to light when a technician using a laptop computer found family images and further videos depicting women naked or in various states of undress in the female changing accommodation in a hanger or sports gym at the station.

One victim had been a friend and victim impact statements said they felt totally violated and betrayed.

Defence counsel Robert Linford said Esam first set up the camera in his married quarters when he suspected his wife was having an illicit affair.

He did not intend to be voyeuristic and the videos did not include sexual activity. He deeply regretted what he had done.

"It almost became an illness at a time when he was finding life increasingly difficult at home. So it was he embarked on the filming at Culdrose. It was a significant betrayal of trust of the people he worked with."

Esam had not shown the videos to anyone else. He had already been punished as his wife would not allow him to see his daughter or three stepchildren. If sent to jail he would be discharged from the Service and would otherwise face further punishment from the Royal Navy.

After the hearing, a Navy spokesman said the Service would consider the effect of the conviction on Esam's career before deciding whether or not it would continue.

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