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Iron Age remains discovered at Land's End - by rabbits

By DaveCDM  |  Posted: February 03, 2014

  • Rabbits have alerted archaeological sleuths to a huge find at Lands End.

  • Dean Paton from Big Heritage at the site

  • One of the flint arrowheads

  • A perfectly preserved flint arrowhead

  • The ancient site is on the clifftop 200 yards from Lands End

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ONE of the most important historical finds in Cornwall has been made - not by archaeologists, but by a family of rabbits.

The bunnies set up home at Land's End last year, and began creating themselves an intricate network of tunnels underneath the historic landmark.

Among the soil they unearthed was a series of flint objects, which caught the eye of Land’s End staff member Eddie Williams.

He passed them onto archaeologists who revealed they were a collection of flint scrapers and arrowheads dating back at least 5,000 years.

This prompted Land’s End to commission a thorough archaeological investigation of their land, which discovered evidence of an iron-age hill fort, a Bronze Age barrow cemetery, a Neolithic passage grave and a series of iron-age field-systems, all within ten minutes’ walk of the iconic sign-post.

Dean Paton from Big Heritage said: “It’s amazing how a family of rabbits have set in motion an incredible journey of discovery.

"Within the immediate vicinity of Land’s End, we were able to see a visible time-line of Britain, stretching deep into prehistory.

"As a site famous for having the ‘first and last house’ and a ‘first and last inn’ – we’ve been able to add the first and last hillfort and cemetery.

"Whilst the landscape will have changed considerably over time, it’s likely that the stunning natural beauty of the site would have always been significant to humans.”

Alice Reynolds, Marketing Manager at Land’s End said: “Thousands of people visit Land’s End each year to witness our amazing views and the rare natural habitats we preserve.

"We’re so excited to add heritage to this list, and are putting plans in place to ensure we can help to preserve the archaeology of our site, but also share it with both tourists and local communities.”

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2 comments

  • break  |  February 04 2014, 4:38PM

    So will this land now be labelled as a brown field site (brownfield is previously developed land).Developers will be pleased.

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  • beetlegeuse57  |  February 03 2014, 7:22PM

    Where is Tony Robinson and time team when the rabbits need them.

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