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Exhibition celebrates maritime artist's work

By West Briton  |  Posted: January 03, 2013

  • Hemy's granddaughter Margaret Powell with her favourite painting, Seastudy –1914.

  • Falmouth Art Gallery. Hemy and Friends private view. John Tonkin - Co Curator to the Tuke collection pictured with The Missionary Boat - 1984. Pic: Toby Weller Ref: TRTW20121123B-003_C

  • Hilary Spurrier who lent this painting "Seine Fishers".

  • Falmouth Art Gallery. Hemy and Friends private view. Art Gallery Director Louie Connell and Penryn Mayor Gill Grant with on of their favourites " Constructing South Pier, Mevagissey" by Sir Frank Brangwyn. Pic: Toby Weller Ref: TRTW20121123B-007_C

  • Carlos Zapata with his automata View From The Vandermeer at the exhibition.

  • Falmouth Art Gallery. Hemy and Friends private view. John Owen with "Boat Study" - 1902. Pic: Toby Weller Ref: TRTW20121123B-008_C

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FALMOUTH Art Gallery is celebrating the work and influence of Charles Napier Hemy with a new exhibition.

Hemy (1841-1917) was the leading maritime painter of his generation and the town's first Royal Academician, appointed official painter to the Royal Yacht Squadron.

He settled in Falmouth in 1881, where he produced most of his finest works.

He built and lived at Churchfield (now the Athenaeum Club) and was mentor to Sir Frank Brangwyn, Henry Scott Tuke, John Riley Wilmer and Montague Dawson.

The exhibition, which runs until February 2, features work by Hemy, his family and friends – including Dawson, Stanhope Forbes, Winifred Freeman and William Ayerst Ingram – plus a free programme of workshops inspired by the exhibition. Entry is free and the gallery is open from Monday to Saturday, 10am until 5pm.

Meanwhile, a stained-glass window, created by the community at the gallery, has been highly commended in the Hudson's Heritage Awards.

Falcare, formerly Mencap, and children from Kerrier Pupil Referral Unit, transformed the stairway into a sea of shimmering colours inspired by Henri Matisse's stained-glass windows at the Chapel in Venice. Gallery staff worked with heritage consultant Michael Swift, of Truro Cathedral, at a series of workshops with artist Susan Kinley. The gallery has received £2,000 from Arts Council England for new low-energy lighting in the shop.

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